Drishyam

DrishyamCAST: Ajay Devgn, Tabu, Rajat Kapoor, Shriya Saran, Ishita Dutta
DIRECTION: Nishikant Kamat
GENRE: Thriller
DURATION: 2 hours 43 minutes
DRISHYAM HAS WHAT IT TAKES TO `HOOK’ THE AUDIENCE

STORY: Inspired by Japanese crime-writer, Keigo Higashino’s novel The Devotion of Suspect X, Drishyam(translates as illusion) was originally adapted in Malayalam. That version went on to become a blockbuster, paving the way for copies. The latest is, Nishikant Kamat’s Bollywood adaptation that has adequate promise.

REVIEW: The story revolves around the fourth-standard school drop-out Vijay Salgaonkar (Ajay) who lives in Goa with his wife Nandini(Shriya) and their two daughters. He is a movie buff who runs a cable-video business. Crazy about cinema; he laughs, cries, plots and plans or for that matter even allows films to dictate his sexual desire. All in all, Vijay has a blissed-out existence. Till his teenage daughter Anju(Ishita) goes for a inter-school nature camp. There she encounters Sameer Deshmukh(Risabh Chaddha)the son of IG, Meera Deshmukh(Tabu). The brat shoots a video-clip of the naive girl in the shower. On their return home, crafty Sam seeks to trade `favours’ from Anju. The teenagers are negotiating when an untoward incident occurs, leaving Anju stumped and her family in a fix.

The film gathers momentum as an interesting chase ensues between the cops headed by Sam’s mum, the Inspector General of Police and Anju’s father, Vijay.

Though the first half (that could do with a 10-minute trim) feels sluggish, the pace kicks in when Tabu, the hard-nosed cop enters. Since all evidence from the time her son goes missing, points to the Salgaonkars, she bays for their blood, like a wounded lioness.

Interestingly enough, the unassumingly `innocent’ Vijay matches her with his quick wit and sharp moves.

A suspense drama with a nail-biting finish, Drishyam holds the viewer by the eyeballs till its’ engaging climax.

Ajay, who is the prey here, shines in his role of the protective father. While his family definitely needed to be cast in a more discerning fashion, half a star in this review is reserved for Tabu, who is outstanding as his predator.